Ratings
Energy Ratings

Why BFRC ratings

Impartial

Unlike manufacturers’ own ratings, BFRC ratings confirm that products have been independently verified by experts in building physics so the whole system will perform as promised.

Consumer-friendly

BFRC rainbow ratings are a consumer-friendly way to demonstrate product performance to homeowners. It is easy to explain that an A-rated product will perform better than a B.

Proven

When choosing windows or doors, you can see how they will look but not how they will perform. Invisible performance matters and BFRC ratings prove they will perform as promised.

How BFRC rainbow rating labels work

BFRC rates the performance of windows and doors and gives them a rating between A++ and E. Genuine BFRC rated products are labelled with a small official sticker on the inside of the frame and often a large rainbow label on the surface of the window or door: clear, visible proof that it will perform as promised.

To ensure the product installed is correctly rated, BFRC monitors the integrity of the supply chain. BFRC Approved Installers are able to 'piggyback' on manufacturer ratings, but only BFRC Approved Manufacturers and Installers can use the BFRC rainbow label on the products they sell.

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Easily understood ratings

The BFRC energy rating label looks very similar to other rating schemes which you may have seen on a range of products, from domestic white goods to car tyres. The bandings on the BFRC label are the result of a complex calculation which takes into account a standard size of window, standard building occupancy and average climate conditions. Windows and doors with an energy rating of 0 or higher (Ratings A to A++) are considered to be energy positive.

As with all energy rating labels the performance indicated provides a method of comparing one product against another.


What's behind the rating?

The BFRC energy rating is an energy balance of positive contributions from solar gain minus the negative factors of thermal heat loss and air leakage. The illustrations below describe how the various components of the window or door affect the overall energy performance.